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Thoughts on the “glamourizing/normalizing” obesity vs body positivity conversations

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  • syeda2007syeda2007 Member Posts: 23 Member Member Posts: 23 Member
    There is something or some things we are not doing right if we have the time and energy to promote glamourising being the victim. We are playing at the hands of big pharma, food industries.
    We know those models of body positivity are a cry for help, but after you wipe the tears and talk about your hardships in your journey, isn’t the next step to try and be healthy again?
  • nitaliebennitalieben Member, Premium Posts: 664 Member Member, Premium Posts: 664 Member
    The diet industry is pretty big, multibillion-dollar. I've never seen ads for products that promise to make you fat, there are thousands of products and services promising to make people skinny. If society really was glamorizing obesity, everybody would want to become obese like the glamourous people.

    I'm not really adding anything useful here. I just read this and remembered an old advert I once saw:

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/vintage-weight-gain-ads_n_1119044

    Or what claims to be an old advert anyway.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,119 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,119 Member
    nitalieben wrote: »
    The diet industry is pretty big, multibillion-dollar. I've never seen ads for products that promise to make you fat, there are thousands of products and services promising to make people skinny. If society really was glamorizing obesity, everybody would want to become obese like the glamourous people.

    I'm not really adding anything useful here. I just read this and remembered an old advert I once saw:

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/vintage-weight-gain-ads_n_1119044

    Or what claims to be an old advert anyway.

    Real ads. (I'm almost that old, b. 1955 - old enough to have seen those ads in real life but I can't remember whether in current publications of my childhood, or older ones that would've been old but not yet then quaintly antique).

    Keep in mind that the period of time mentioned (1920s-50s) included difficult times for a lot of people: Depression, wartime rationing, etc. So, truly skinny was an indicator of poverty or deprivation, maybe non-robust health. Also, if you look at the ads targeting women, it's obvious that part of what they're talking about is breasts . . . from a time when ads didn't really quite as much talk about breast enhancement explicitly. (For much of my childhood, menstrual products were marketed in ways that didn't give much clue what they were for, which is kind of hilarious. Breast enhancement would've been something that would be more discreetly alluded to, also, generally.)

    ETA: Even today, there are "hard gainers", people who find it difficult to gain weight but want to do so. (There's a forum area here where you can see some of those posts.) There are products marketed to that segment, even today. But - as NorthCascades says - it isn't mass-marketed for *everyone* now . . . nor was it mass-marketed to all back in the era you were talking about, even though average body weight was quite a bit lower. It was more an "ads in the back of magazines" low-key thing.
    edited October 2020
  • lauriekallislauriekallis Member, Premium Posts: 127 Member Member, Premium Posts: 127 Member
    kdbulger wrote: »
    And on a personal note: when I finally made the changes in my life to eat better and get fit (and was no longer obese as a result) - it was because I LOVED myself exactly as I was and wanted to give myself the best first and foremost. No amount of fat shaming could have gotten me there.

    This rings so true for me too.

  • sal10851sal10851 Member Posts: 171 Member Member Posts: 171 Member
    Most of my family is overweight or obese and I have personally seen the devastation it's causing. I weigh 219 pounds and I'm the "skinny" guy in the family. That's how bad it is. I'm focusing on a normal weight for my height to waist ratio and I'm still about 30 to 40 pounds from my goal. It's become so normalized we are coming up with terms such as "healthy", "husky", "big-boned", "chubby", "curvy". All in the effort to normalize fat.
  • fat2thingirlfat2thingirl Member Posts: 26 Member Member Posts: 26 Member
    shana7999 wrote: »
    I think what needs to be encouraged and high-lighted in society is loving yourself NO MATTER what size you are. Life is a precious gift, and it needs to be cherished and respected. Care should be given to our bodies, but this obsession with body image is unhealthy. Should we strive for health? Yes!!! does this look the same for everyone?? No!! Stop judging everyone else and focus on your own happiness and gift of life. ✨💪🏻✨

    My perspective.

    I hope it resonates with others!

    I agree, that was really well put :):) have a great day!

  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,558 Member Member Posts: 1,558 Member
    sal10851 wrote: »
    Most of my family is overweight or obese and I have personally seen the devastation it's causing. I weigh 219 pounds and I'm the "skinny" guy in the family. That's how bad it is. I'm focusing on a normal weight for my height to waist ratio and I'm still about 30 to 40 pounds from my goal. It's become so normalized we are coming up with terms such as "healthy", "husky", "big-boned", "chubby", "curvy". All in the effort to normalize fat.

    Best of luck on your journey.

    To be honest the terms have been around for years. I remember back in college I worked a part time job at a mall. The store across the way from my place was Catherine's Stout Shop.

    Nobody was kidding anyone regarding the target market.
  • evilokcevilokc Member Posts: 247 Member Member Posts: 247 Member
    when i see a person who is over weight i immediately see them as being weak willed and lazy even though i know thats not always the case. no one would choose to be heavy when it is socially unattractive and doesn't feel well. while i was never obese i was heavy enough to be sporting a double chin and i disliked everything about it. i dont think everyone needs to have a beach body but i do believe people need to strive for a healthy bmi
  • Slacker16Slacker16 Member Posts: 1,154 Member Member Posts: 1,154 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    East Asian countries have a real culture of fat shaming, yet obesity rates are very low. I don't agree with the premise that fat shaming leads to more obesity problem.

    Does it also, statistically speaking, result in a healthier relationship with food?
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